Wanted!

Ideomancer is looking for two new junior editors for fiction only. Slush wrangler wannabes should be VERY familiar with our magazine and know the styles of fiction we publish. Our guidelines state:
Ideomancer publishes speculative fiction and poetry that explores the edges of ideas; stories that subvert, refute and push the limits. We want unique pieces from authors willing to explore non-traditional narratives and take chances with tone, structure and execution, balance ideas and character, emotion and ruthlessness. We also have an eye for more traditional tales told with excellence.

We are especially interested in non-traditional formats, hyperfiction, and work that explores the boundaries not just of its situation but of the internet-as-page.


In addition to reading slush weekly (usually fewer than eight stories per week), you may be asked to work with a writer to help polish his/her work. Editors also help out with publicity and funding initiatives, and occasional administrative tasks.

The position will require a 30-day commitment during an open reading period, at the end of which either of us (you or us) can opt out if we don't feel we're a good fit.

Please contact us via the publisher (at) ideomancer (dot) com address by Saturday, March 22, 2014 if you are interested in giving us a try. Tell us why you are interested in slushing for us in particular, and remember that our current editors' work is not eligible for publication in Ideomancer, nor is this a paying position.

Thanks, and look forward to your interest!

The Ideomancer Speculative Fiction team
Yes, we see this every three months. But I'm really impressed by this one; we got some good stuff this quarter. Whee!

#

We’re back with our first issue of 2013, a double handful of emotional stories and poems for the dark beginnings of spring. Our March issues always fall, without plans for it, into a travelling theme; here are some tales for the road.

Gabriel Murray’s “Swan-Brother” takes us into an alternate historical world for a story that’s infinitely close to home; Leah Thomas’s “Rubbernecking” gauges the distance between us and the house next door, and how near or far it can really be; and Sunny Moraine’s “The Horse Latitudes” combs two blood-soaked pasts and turns its bearings toward a new way.

Poetry from Megan Arkenberg, David C. Kopaska-Merkel, Alexandra Seidel, and Michele Bannister travels through crossroads and orbits alike, into the space between where we are and what we desire – and as always, our book reviewers bring you their thoughts on the latest releases.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Enjoy the issue, Happy New Year, and we’ll see you in the springtime!
Wanted!

Ideomancer is looking for two new junior editors for fiction only. Slush wrangler wannabes should be VERY familiar with our magazine and know the styles of fiction we publish. Our guidelines state:
Ideomancer publishes speculative fiction and poetry that explores the edges of ideas; stories that subvert, refute and push the limits. We want unique pieces from authors willing to explore non-traditional narratives and take chances with tone, structure and execution, balance ideas and character, emotion and ruthlessness. We also have an eye for more traditional tales told with excellence.

We are especially interested in non-traditional formats, hyperfiction, and work that explores the boundaries not just of its situation but of the internet-as-page.


In addition to reading slush weekly (usually fewer than eight stories per week), you may be asked to work with a writer to help polish his/her work. Editors also help out with publicity and funding initiatives, and occasional administrative tasks.

The position will require a 30-day commitment during an open reading period, at the end of which either of us (you or us) can opt out if we don't feel we're a good fit.

Please contact us via the publisher (at) ideomancer (dot) com address by Wednesday, October 17, 2012 if you are interested in giving us a try. Tell us why you are interested in slushing for us in particular, and remember that our current editors' work is not eligible for publication in Ideomancer, nor is this a paying position.

Thanks, and look forward to your interest!

The Ideomancer Speculative Fiction team
The September issue of Ideomancer is live, and our third issue of 2012 is all about insides and outsides, and the delicate, permeable walls between.

Alexei Collier’s “The Bohemians” ponders the fine lines between persona and person, and how prepared we are – or aren’t – to see both in someone; Nathaniel Lee’s “Gastrophidia” literally tackles the disasters that occur when the things one holds inside break into open air; and James Will Brady – another Ideomancer author who’s made the transition to joining our editorial staff! – caps off the issue with “Judge,” which treads the tricky territory between part of the group and outsider, and who’s in or out in whose eyes.

Poetry from Ann Schwader, David Glen Larson, Barry King, and Alexa Seidel transmogrifies, metamorphoses, and takes on new forms – and as always, there are the usual book reviews.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.




Also, a side note: We'll be closed to fiction and poetry submissions for this quarter, reopening December 1st, 2012, with our winter issue. We've got a good stock of work for the next issue or two, and are taking a well-deserved winter vacation.



Enjoy the issue, and have a wonderful autumn.
The June issue of Ideomancer is available for your ready delectation, going on some wandering summer travels through three very different rural geographies.

Wendy N. Wagner’s “Barnstormers” shows us a night on a summer fairground tour in a small and dusty future; Maigen Turner’s “Eliza Jane Goes Into Town” – her first publication! – tells a frontier story about our complicated relationships with the wilderness outside our windows; and Frank Ard’s “The Sensation of Falling” is laced with geography changed and changing: the maps of home, family, and what away means shifting under your feet.

Poetry from Michele Bannister, Devon Miller-Duggan, Christelle Mariano, and Eric Zboya goes to other planets, other media, and underwater in your dreams – and as always, there are the usual book reviews.




I usually add this in every post, in case, but this time I want to call a bit of attention to it:

If you like what we're doing with Ideomancer -- the fiction, poetry, and reviews, or the commitment to providing a showcase for literary speculative work from emerging authors from all backgrounds, genders, orientations, and geographies -- please consider dropping something into our tip jar. The sole sources of funding for Ideomancer are reader contributions and, as the publisher, my pocket, and when we say that even six dollars makes a big difference to us, we mean it -- that's a poem paid for.

Six dollars from every single one of our Twitter followers would keep us publishing free, excellent work for approximately seven years.

So while we know times are hairy as ever, if you've got six bucks to spare, we'd appreciate it -- the volunteer staff at Ideomancer love the work we do and the authors we get to work with, and we'd love to do that work longer, better, and with (hopefully!) a nice raise for the authors creating the fiction and poetry we're so privileged to showcase.
leahbobet: (gardening)
May 15-16, 2012 Progress Notes:

On Roadstead Farm

Just like the title says. I did work all day yesterday, and the most part of today too. At this point, we're looking at definitely negative words -- I've sliced something like 2,000 or more, and added...okay, who even knows? It's all just a ball o' confusion over here.

Book proposals. It's a thing. Another skill to learn.

If I couldn't actively feel the thing getting better with each pass, each iteration? I'd probably be going out of my skin.


Otherwise? All work and no play makes Leah a dull girl. I did not go to a food security lecture today, and I am not going to that noon yoga class tomorrow, mostly because I want this finished by tomorrow evening, when I am most definitely going to one of the many spinoffs of the Trampoline Hall pub lecture/storytelling thing, because one of Dr. My Roommate's colleagues is giving a talk on Erdos.

Time not spent writing the past few days has been spent running errands or cooking food. Time spent not doing those things has been spent curled up in bed with my laptop, watching Samurai Champloo episodes, in an attempt to cool my brain off. All very boring.

The one unboring thing? Ideomancer has made the longlist for the British Fantasy Awards this year. Yeah, it's the longlist, not the shortlist. Yeah, it's a small thing. But we're a volunteer-staffed webzine that pays all of $40 a story, and inside? I am dying with pride. :)
leahbobet: (gardening)
So: stuff afoot! Here's some!

1) You may or may not be aware of [livejournal.com profile] magick4terri, an LJ-based fundraiser to help writer, artist and editor Terri Windling through a serious financial crisis. I've never met Terri, but her work in establishing urban fantasy, in creating a distinct aesthetic, in creating a space for certain kinds of art and fostering it at Endicott Studios has been a huge influence on what I do, and how, and has been crucial to tons of friends and our community.

So. I've posted an auction item here -- a signed, personalized first edition of Above to be delivered the second I get hands on one, as well as any bookmarks or swag that accumulates -- and if you're interested in bidding, go to. There's also some fantastic, droolworthy stuff being offered, so taking the time to browse it is, well, time well spent.

2) The YA Scavenger Hunt, organized by author Colleen Houck, is on from December 1 to 4th! She's corralled a whole bunch of YA authors into creating a scavenger hunt for your delectation, featuring not only a bucket of extra and secret material for a whole lot of awesome upcoming releases, but there are also fabulous prizes. Every author has a piece of secret content and a link to the next person on the hunt, and if you collect all the words marked in red and enter the contest before December 4th, you could win those fabulous prizes we mentioned up there.



My featured content is for author Lisa Nowak, and everything's at the website. The secret content for Above is...out there in the internets. Being secretive. Waiting to be caught.

3) The December Ideomancer has hit the wider Internets!

Our final issue for 2011 speaks on a winter topic: connection, and isolation, for the months when we here at Ideomancer headquarters are hemmed in most by the snow and dark, and reach out most to each other for light.

Michael John Grist’s "The Orphan Queen" shows, slantwise, the terribleness of isolation and the terrible bravery it takes to conquer it; Ken Schneyer’s "Neural Net", one of our first pieces of hyperfiction in much too long, echoes through its intertwined structure the ideas of withdrawal, and love, and hiding from the world; and Erica Satifka returns to our pages with "Signs Following", a soft, edged story about faraway places and the things we will do when our ties to both friends and universe are threatened.

Poetry from Mary Turzillo, Brit Mandelo, C.G. Olsen, and David C. Kopaska-Merkel dips from relationships to houses to black holes, all places to be alone together, and as always, the usual book reviews.

We’d also like to note another staff departure: Marsha Sisolak has been a part of Ideomancer since 2002, as a junior editor, then publisher, and then the aesthetic eye behind the art that goes up with every story and poem we publish, and after almost a decade in the small press coal mines, she’s moving on to focus more on her own (excellent!) writing. Thank you, Marsha – you’ll be missed!

As usual, we hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.


So, consider yourselves all announced. Me, I'm going to get some lunch. Happy internetting!
Our September 2011 issue picks at the notion of time: the time we have, the time we don’t, and the breaking of all those rules entirely.

Georgina Bruce’s “Convent Geometry” reaches across time and space, through walls, against sickness to bring three people together – to somewhat dire consequences; Ian Donald Keeling’s “Broken” splinters it to reflect one man’s splintered heart; and Jen Volant’s “Jacob and the Jane Riches”, finds what might heal our wounds when time doesn’t do the job.

Poetry from Liz Bourke, David C. Kopaska-Merkel and Kendall Evans, Jacqueline West, and J.C. Runolfson goes back towards the classics, stops off at Mark Twain, and dips forward, into the whole of the universe, and this month’s book reviews cover two books which use historical elements to deadly effect.

We’d like to also take this opportunity to thank our long-time (and founding!) poetry editor, Jaime Lee Moyer, on the occasion of her departure from Ideomancer, and to welcome our new poetry editor, former associate editor Beth Langford, to the department.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Have a great autumn!
The June 2011 issue of Ideomancer is live, and it's full of summer travels: both physical and of the mind and soul and heart.

Cory Skerry’s "Rendered Down" sets us off to sea, and across the thin line between one world and the next. Alter Reiss’s "A Letter from Northern Niaro" narrates a trip into the country, and the distance grown between the person one is and the person one used to be. Finally, Anatoly Belilovsky’s "Chrestomathy", with the misfiring of a bullet, crosses continents and builds a dizzying and breathtaking new history.

Poetry from repeat contributors Megan Arkenberg, Mike Allen, and W.C. Roberts and first-time contributor Shannon Connor Winward rounds out the issue, taking us out to distant, devastated planets; deep into our own skins; back in time, and forward. And our staff reviewers survey a quartet of modern-style mysteries that cross into the Arthurian and the mimetic, and hop across the Atlantic.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.


And while we're on the topic: this means we're reopened to fiction submissions, although we are going to be closed to poetry submissions for this quarter, reopening in September.

Enjoy!

November.

Dec. 1st, 2010 10:23 pm
In internet time, I did sort of miss a bunch of that. Sorry, peoples. Things were busy here, and there have been health issues (mine and other people's) and deadlines (mine and other people's), and it was all exceedingly stressful. Blogging has been about five thousand items down my list on any given day.

That said, here's some of it?

1) First off, a fiction sale: "The Ground Whereon She Stands", which is a story about boundaries, lesbian hedgewitches who actually wear clothes, and the subtleties of interpersonal communication, will be appearing in a future issue of the (reanimated) Realms of Fantasy. I'm not sure what the pub date is, but when I know, you will also know.

2) Today is issue day for Ideomancer, which I am willing to admit was one of those major sources of stress this month. Despite that, this issue's a really, really good one: we have fiction from [livejournal.com profile] intertribal, [livejournal.com profile] beccadelarosa, and Stephen Case, and poetry from [livejournal.com profile] hawkwing_lb (who is also going to be doing some book reviews for us), Kelly Rose Pflug-Back, and WC Roberts. At the height of my stress I was doing some proofreading of it, and went damn, this is a good TOC.

We are, of course, reopened to subs. Please form an orderly queue.

3) I have been thinking, due to about a half-dozen things that happened last month, about the nature of friendship: what that word means to me and other people, and the web of expectation and self-fulfilling prophecies that results from what weight we assign that word.

There may be an essay in this one of these days. Right now it's mostly just a mental tumbleweed.

4) I need, if anyone has it, a word for the quality of being present, of be-here-now. In-the-momentness. I don't mean a made-up word. A real one.

5) For the first time since spring, I am noodling at a short story. It has a title and 100 words. I don't know what the title, which is decidedly right, has to do with anything, and I don't know what's with the thing about the fingers. I am putting myself in the hand of fate on this one.

6) For those keeping up on the saga of Above as it trundles through the publication process, I expect line edits next week or week after. Also, a Locus announcement in the next issue or the one after that.


That's most of what I can think of right now that bears repeating.

How was your month?
leahbobet: (bat signal)
Because I know you've all always wanted to work under my iron fist... :)


Wanted!

Ideomancer is looking for two new junior editors for fiction only. Slush wrangler wannabes should be VERY familiar with our magazine and know the styles of fiction we publish. Our guidelines state: Ideomancer publishes speculative fiction and poetry that explores the edges of ideas; stories that subvert, refute and push the limits. We want unique pieces from authors willing to explore non-traditional narratives and take chances with tone, structure and execution, balance ideas and character, emotion and ruthlessness. We also have an eye for more traditional tales told with excellence.

We are especially interested in non-traditional formats, hyperfiction, and work that explores the boundaries not just of its situation but of the internet-as-page.

In addition to reading slush weekly (usually fewer than eight stories per week), you may be asked to work with a writer to help polish his/her work. Editors also help out with publicity and funding initiatives.

The position will require a 30-day commitment during an open reading period, at the end of which either of us (you or us) can opt out if we don't feel we're a good fit.

Please contact us via the publisher (at) ideomancer (dot) com address by Sunday, November 21, 2010 if you are interested in giving us a try. Tell us why you are interested in slushing for us in particular, and remember that our current editors' work is not eligible for publication in Ideomancer, nor is this a paying position. We all do this gig out of love.

Thanks, and look forward to your interest!

The Ideomancer Speculative Fiction team
The September 2010 issue of Ideomancer is live, and it delves into some off-kilter relationships: how they go subtly right, or wrong, and what we do about it.

Sandra Odell's "Afterglow" takes an aspect of love and need and transforms it into something literal and disturbing; Lenora Rose's "It Shall Come to Pass on a Summer’s Day" hops through time, showing the complications of a narrative that’s usually rendered simple; and Catherine Krahe's "Fairest in the Land" takes on the most interesting, and maybe most neglected phase of a relationship: after it ends.

Our poets this month — Rachel Swirsky, David Kopaska-Merkel, Mikal Trimm, and Ann K. Schwader — round out the issue, and books reviewed include Nnedi Okorafor's Who Fears Death, George Mann's Ghosts of Manhattan, and Douglas Smith's Chimerascope.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

See you in December!
The weather's broken here in the T-dot; it's been cooler and sunshiny with bouts of Crazy! Rain! for added flavour for the past few days (which, might I add, is really lovely when we have all the windows open at home: it sounds like you're in the last treehouse outpost of civilization during a very Bradburyesque green end of the world). My two-week-long bout of insomnia hasn't broken just yet, but the cool weather's helping: I've managed to sleep some the past few days. Not enough (wah!), but enough to work:


The window table at Aroma is mine. I will unhesitatingly cut all trespassers.


The edit has progressed into chapter four, which is a land of mostly fairly focused and isolated notes, one of the major systemic issues, and then one tricky interconnected thing that sent me back and forward in the manuscript to construct and seed a consistent rationale for a whole line of conflict that's better than because I said so. I think it works now. I'll check for soundness on the next pass.

I've also hit the point where there are a few things I need to ask my editor about: wordcount inflation and clarifications on some notes and the like. I shall bundle them up in a package with an attractive bow and e-mail them over tonight.


Otherwise, things we have been doing?

Went to a workshop in Kensington last night that was half identifying culinary and medicinal herbs that grow randomly in the downtown core and half making salve out of them; the workshop leader was, coincidentally enough, someone I went to elementary school with (see: the Only 500 Player Characters in Toronto theorem). They're doing another one on canning and pickling next month, and that's on the calendar. Afterwards, watched Proof with Dr. My Roommate, which was a startlingly chewable and amazingly well-written movie, and managed to finally deliver a late birthday present to a friend, who seemed to (yay!) really like it.

The autumn concert ticket pile has been started. Just two shows so far, but consider this to be a nice solid foundation for the fifty-floor skyscraper I'm planning.

Planning for the Most Epic Housewarming in the Universe has also started. A couple days of my time are going to be spent test-cooking party snacks very soon.

Did a stack of additional notes on Indestructible while I was feeling it the other afternoon, and have roughed the structure of the first few scenes. There is a thing in the file which could be the first line. It could not. First lines delineate and circumscribe so very much about a book. They have to be chosen with ultimate care.

Put in some work towards getting the September issue of Ideomancer ready, which will be coming to that website over there near you on, well, September 1st. I'm really pleased with the TOC on this one: it's thematically solid, but really nicely varied in terms of style and genre. We just bought a raft of really good poetry, too.

There is a cabbage as big as my head in my fridge, from last week's farmshare. Dinner tonight will be cabbage rolls. Apple coleslaw or Waldorf salad may also be in my future. It depends if I can get some decent apples on the way home.

Speaking of which, my battery has maybe 10 minutes left on it (and the downside of working at Aroma is that the plugs do not, how we say, plug), so home is where I'm going. More tonight, maybe, if my concentration keeps.
Quote, from this article on the New York City bedbug problem:

"'We want to send a message to bedbugs,' City Council Speaker Christine Quinn said, announcing the measure Wednesday: 'Drop dead. Your days are over.'"

1) Bedbugs aren't listening. They're bugs. You cannot send them a message. They have no motherfucking language centre or mammalian brain to put one in.
2) You cannot engage in psychological warfare tough talk with bugs. They're not scared. Because they're bugs and do not hear or understand you.
3) Nobody is actually going to send the United States Marines into a protracted land war with bedbugs right after this announcement.


Yes, there are literal, figurative, metaphoric, formal (as in an arrangement of forms), slang, etc. interpretations of language and all are valid; that's one of the things that makes language cool. But language isn't just forms; it's not an empty box. There's meaning in that box. Words mean things.

This is a mindfulness applicable to writing prose fiction; it deals with spotting second-order cliches and getting them out of your writing. It's also a good way to make sure, well, we aren't sounding hellaciously silly. :p

This is why rhetoric is cool and more people should learn it. The end.
We are pleased to announce that the June 2010 issue of Ideomancer is now live!

This issue focuses on questions of histories, real and imagined: what happened, what we would have liked to have happened; how we imagined things to have been.

Lon Prater’s “The Atrocities of King George” tackles the question of revisionist history head-on — in a slightly revised history of its own. Ilan Lerman’s “Saint Stephen Street” remixes, rejigs, and recurves around a history that its protagonists would rather not remember. Finally, Megan Arkenberg’s “The Copperroof War” shows what happens with the histories nobody wants to tell, and what happens when history itself, dusty and stored away, becomes deadly indeed.

Our poets this month — Larry Hammer, Stephen M. Wilson, Jennifer Crow, Amal El-Mohtar, and Jessica P. Wick — take us from the lofty heights of Alexandria to the more mundane historical questions of he said, she said.

We hope that you enjoy it!
leahbobet: (gardening)
1) The Sparkly Purple Girly Laptop arrived this evening, in plenty of time for me to load it up for the forthcoming trip to Arizona (aka CupcakeCon, aka the Tucson Festival of Books, aka Esteban Reyes's Birthday Bash). It's charging itself up on my floor as we speak:



(Yes, I also have a cobalt blue mouse. Girly girl girl!)

Her name is apparently Lillian Lovelace Gish. I don't know why. I think it's like puppies: you have to hold them in your arms before you know what they're really supposed to be called.

2) Three of the Nebula nominees polled for the SF Signal Mind Meld on what other works of fiction were also Nebula-worthy this year mentioned either my bad self or "The Parable of the Shower". I am tickled. I will now call myself a Writer's Writer for a week.

3) Two more quick reviews: One blogger likes "Bears", and another didn't like "Mister Oak".

And three things will have to make a post tonight, because I need to either do some quick laundry or fix a lunch for tomorrow. And then maybe, dare we hope, write words?
The first Ideomancer of 2010 -- and the launch of an upgraded, updated website -- is live.

We’ve, let’s say, been busy.

It’s been a long time coming and a lot of sweat, but we’ve rebuilt, redesigned, and relaunched the website: as well as the usual fiction, poetry, and non-fiction offerings, there’s now easy access to our Twitter feed and Facebook page, a shoutbox and comments function to let you, the reader, talk back, and a tidier, modernized build. The design credit goes to Erin Hoffman ([livejournal.com profile] zhai), Associate Editor and our new webmaster, who donated her considerable skill to build us something beautiful. Tip yer hats, folks!

We’re also launching a new feature on the [livejournal.com profile] ideomancer Livejournal Community: Associate Editor Alena McNamara ([livejournal.com profile] amcnamara)will curate the Ideomancer Atlas of Imagination, a collection of links, bobs, flotsam, and cool stuff we’ve found washed up on the Internet that illumines the geography of the imagination. The Atlas of Imagination will turn a page every Monday and Saturday.

Thanks to the hard design and research work of our poetry editor, Jaime Lee Moyer ([livejournal.com profile] stillnotbored), we’ve also set up a swag shop at Skreened, which, aside from making tee-shirts, tote bags, mugs, and hoodies, sources from ethical companies, uses green manufacturing processes, and supports projects around the world through Kiva microloans. So: a portion of every purchase from the new Ideomancer Swag Shop finances projects around the world. Another portion helps feed Ideomancer’s authors and poets, as do donations from our readers.

There’s more to come: we have, as they say, Plans (TM) for the next year.

But as for the issue:

March’s fiction and poetry explores loss and regrets across time, space, and genre, and in some unexpected ways. LaShawn M. Wanak returns for a second appearance in our pages with “Future Perfect,” a decidedly different take on the question of doing it over again; Nicole J. LeBoeuf’s “The Day the Sidewalks Melted” offers a vivid look at personal apocalypses; and Autumn Christian’s “Sunshine, Sunshine” explores the edges of the things we never even admit are missing in lush, Gothic prose.

Our poets this month — Nebula nominee Rachel Swirsky, Chris Flowers, Liz Bourke, and Shef Reynolds — throw in their own riffs on the questions of loss and regret.


With that, I'm also glad to announce that we're reopened to submissions of both fiction and poetry as of...well, now.

And having finally got the thing up, I am now going out for a crepe.
It gives us great gratification to announce that the December 2009 issue of Ideomancer is live!

Our last issue of 2009 tosses out a shout-out to folktales told against the cold with a lineup of more traditional fantasy fiction and poetry. If our folktales are a little more modern, well, that's par for the course.

C.S.E. Cooney's "Oak Park Eris" dips into the everyday problems of a middle-aged witch -- in the suburbs of Chicago; Mari Ness reimagines an old fairytale with "Rumpled Skin"; and Autumn Canter narrates the impact of magic on one woman, one family, and one mid-20th century town.

Our poets this month -- Megan Arkenberg, Michael Meyerhofer, Jennifer Jerome, and Marcie Lynn Tentchoff -- all tackle traditional fairytale material with a modern sensibility: reimagining, recasting, and reconsidering those oldest winter stories.


We're also taking a bit of a winter break and will be closed to submissions until March 1, 2010, due to some hefty (and pleasant!) overstock of stories and poems. We'll have some shiny new stuff to roll out for 2010, including a new web design, new features, and some really funky fiction and poetry, so do not adjust your sets.
November 21, 2009 Progress Notes:

"Nothing But Flowers"

Words today: 275.
Words total: 275.
Reason for stopping: I've laid the sod here, and now I would like to go and read.

Darling du Jour: Their apartment is the epitome of bohemian splendor: concrete-and-plank bookcases, dirty coffee mugs, and old copies of alternative weeklies.

Mean Things: I can't even map that yet. This is less mean and more...well, wry.
Research Roundup: Heartsease, a couple sets of lyrics, which one's the mortar and which one's the pestle. Yeah, I know I should already know that.

Books in progress: Emma Bull, Territory.
The glamour: Today was one of those days where I never actually woke up, and have just been dreaming all afternoon and evening with the small expedient of having my eyes open. Everything is a little grey and hallucinatory and slow, and I would not in the least be surprised if something totally outside of logic just strolled through the door.

Yah. I don't need to do drugs. We DIY altered states around here, thanks.

I did, at least, still make it out to the market for pierogies and soba (where the woman working at the European deli thought my Threadless Communist Party tee-shirt was the funniest thing ever), and I did finish the book review I was writing for Ideo. And wrote an editorial letter. So the objective world wasn't completely abandoned for the day.

Off to read, then.
This was one of those afternoons/evenings where I was an Awesome Freelancer. This is what we call those days where, if I was this productive and sharp and motivated and clever all the time, I'd actually be able to go freelance and not starve and it'd be fun and not just stressful. I get about four weeks' worth of those days in any given calendar year.

So I will just share with you that today I finished another mini-project for the Great OWW Home Reno (a self-directed site-updating production by Yours Truly), shovelled non-insignificant amounts of workshop support mail, dispatched a whole bunch of Ideomancer second reads to their various dooms, managed to get back in touch with two authors I'd lost touch with about their stories, wrote a book review for the December issue, tidied my apartment a bit, and blocked out my schedule for this week, since I appear to actually have a social calendar going this month.

There are five actionable e-mails left in my inbox, and two of them are easy. Mwaha.

The other thing I have to do tonight is this post.


A while back, a gentleman from Golden Moon Tea dropped me an e-mail asking if he could have a link on the website (yes, sadly neglected right now; I'll get to it, I promise). I don't make a habit of linking things on the personal website that I don't actually, well, like and use; longtime denizens of here will probably have picked up that I am not really hot on advertising in general and prefer to have it blocked from my life whenever possible, never mind not being huge on being a conduit for it. Also, having been a bookseller for four years and change, I'm...in some ways a touch sensitive about my credibility when it comes to taste and recommendations: when your taste in something is being used as a barometer, positively or negatively, for people to decide which books they're going to buy, you get really hardcore about giving honest, unbiased evaluations of things and not recommending something unless you mean it, so as to not lose that customer's trust. I told the nice gentleman this, and he offered to mail me some samples.

Okay, thought I, mulling over whether this constituted selling out or not, and when they arrived, I brought them to work to share with [livejournal.com profile] ginny_t, who is among other things my Dayjob Partner in Fancy Tea Snobbery. We drank the tea over the past few weeks and Had Opinions on the matter.

Therefore, this is my tea review.

Sugar Caramel Oolong

This was okay -- not too sweet, not too tannic -- but really, really, really light. [livejournal.com profile] ginny_t noted she is not an oolong drinker habitually for just this reason; I have it sometimes, but also tend to prefer something stronger. I'm a Russian Caravan kind of girl. This is really light. So, kind of struck out on grounds of personal taste.

Honey Pear black tea

Okay, now this one was really awesome. Gutsy and sweet and sort of smooth, the way things involving honey are, and smelled and tasted distinctly like real pears. The balance was really good -- not too sweet -- and all elements were in there as advertised. I would have this one again. Nom.

Coconut Pouchong

I was feeling a little sicky the day I had this one, which may have spoiled my objectivity on the matter. What I do recall here was that the predominant taste was young coconut: if you've ever had coconut water or juice, it had that same strong, sharp mid-tongue kind of flavour. This decidedly did not taste like fake coconut, but it tasted a lot like coconut and in some ways not enough like tea?

I do like nice long pouchong leaves though. Pretty!

Nepalese Afternoon Tea

Advertised with "notes of honey, lotus, and fragrant sandalwood." While obviously a good-quality black tea, it didn't really strike me as fancy or awesome among black teas. It was there. It was there nicely enough, but mostly it was just there.

Tippy Earl Grey

This, though, was nice. There is a certain degree to which earl grey is earl grey is earl grey, but you can tell the good stuff from the mediocre stuff very easily, and it's to do with the balance of bergamot flavour to black tea ballsiness to other. This one apparently has lavender in it, and you can spot it there both in the nose and when you taste it. It really added something, and it was subtly different enough to make the whole thing interesting without taking this out of the subgenre of earl grey. Bergamot was light and not cloying and tasted oddly fresh. I'd possibly go back for seconds on this if I had to get specifically earl grey (not my favourite, although I'll drink it).

I split this one with a different coworker; [livejournal.com profile] ginny_t doesn't like earl grey and Other Coworker needed tea badly that morning, and knows my desk is where it lives. He gave good report.


So, general verdict?

1) I'll probably buy some of that Honey Pear sometime.
2) I probably won't actually link this tea place on my website, since I can only vouch for one unqualified win here out of five; otherwise, while it was good-quality stuff, I wasn't head over heels. That's maybe not enough to place an ongoing recommendation on the wider internets.
3) I find myself not opposed to people sending me free tea. I suspect it's not hurting my popularity at the office either.

This has been your first and hopefully not only Tea Review. Good night and good luck.

November 2016

S M T W T F S
  12345
6 789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930   

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 23rd, 2017 04:50 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios